Category Archives: Architecture

Portuguese business fascinated in cooperation with Point out City Organizing and Architecture …

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An art show for toilets and ductwork

Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia

Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia

The Roman architect Vitruvius wrote that successful buildings should be of good quality, fulfill the purpose they were built for, and provide delight for the eyes. Several millennia later, progress is being made on Vitruvius’s first two precepts. However, for Rem Koolhaas, director of the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, architecture has lost the potential to delight. A case in point appears at the first exhibit to greet visitors to the Biennale’s Central Pavilion. Under the dome, with its Art Nouveau-style frescoes portraying haloed figures and nudes, Koolhaas’s team has suspended an example of debased contemporary design: a cross-section of generic gray-panelled drop ceiling sliced open to reveal innards of metal ducts for plumbing, electricity and HVAC systems.

As an architect, Koolhaas is the ultimate sellout. Last year, a public outcry forced him back to revise his design for tearing up part of Venice’s 16th-century Fondaco dei Tedeschi so it can be converted into a shopping mall for Benetton. Yet without a hint of irony, Koolhaas as Biennale director complains that corporate culture has imposed a mind-numbing conformity among his colleagues. “The market economy has eroded the moral status of architecture,” Koolhaas writes in the catalogue for his exhibition. “It has divorced architects from the public and pushed them into the arms of the private sector—they do not serve ‘you’ anymore, but a diffuse ‘them.’ ”

And so Koolhaas has removed practising architects (besides himself) from the stage. In fact, he agreed to direct the show only if he could sever all connections to contemporary architecture. The most radical show at the Biennale is Elements Of Architecture. Here, Koolhaas, with a team of Harvard grad students, has deconstructed the last several thousand years of architectural history with a sampling of 15 different building elements chosen from different cultures and eras. This arty history of ceilings, doors and windows is told through a barrage of objects, charts, photographs, movies and endless texts. One gallery on toilets is covered in wallpaper that includes explicit photographs of people using various fixtures designed for defecation and urination. There are also actual toilets ranging from a Roman chariot-styled latrine to a computerized Japanese “washlet” that measures the chemical composition of the user’s waste.

Elements details the advantages of the latest building technologies while obsessively documenting what has been lost to the exigencies of the global economy. One gallery devoted to modern facades describes how exterior walls evolved from an ensemble of stylistic parts to a skin focused on protection against the elements. On the floor are facade sections including a media facade that conveys information, and a green one embedded with plants. We are constantly reminded of the trade-offs that come with technology. A display of a heavily insulated facade notes—erroneously—that because this type of wall is focused on saving energy, its windows cannot be opened: “People are not to be trusted to regulate the environment.”

The sense of hopelessness continues at Koolhaas’s Monditalia exhibition in the Arsenale building. Homage is paid to Italy’s past with a faded 5th-century map, printed on an enormous billowing sheet. Yet many of the modern “case studies” emphasize the country’s failures. One exhibit features photographs of abandoned masterpieces of Italian modern architecture built during the country’s boom years in the 1950s. An exhibit on the resort city of Milano Marittima exposes how real estate speculation has littered the place with derelict, uninhabited buildings and tourist traps.

Fortunately, Koolhaas was unable to impose his vision on all 66 national pavilions exhibiting at the Biennale. In fact, Italy’s own pavilion presents an exuberant counterpoint to Monditalia. Here, an exhibit of photographs displays stylish modern works of architecture from Milan; another showcases modern forms sensitively grafted onto historic buildings, and a third celebrates works that address the constraints of their sites. Rem Koolhaas would do well to study this pavilion before he attempts to design another shopping mall in Venice.

An art show for toilets and ductwork

Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia

Francesco Galli/Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia

The Roman architect Vitruvius wrote that successful buildings should be of good quality, fulfill the purpose they were built for, and provide delight for the eyes. Several millennia later, progress is being made on Vitruvius’s first two precepts. However, for Rem Koolhaas, director of the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, architecture has lost the potential to delight. A case in point appears at the first exhibit to greet visitors to the Biennale’s Central Pavilion. Under the dome, with its Art Nouveau-style frescoes portraying haloed figures and nudes, Koolhaas’s team has suspended an example of debased contemporary design: a cross-section of generic gray-panelled drop ceiling sliced open to reveal innards of metal ducts for plumbing, electricity and HVAC systems.

As an architect, Koolhaas is the ultimate sellout. Last year, a public outcry forced him back to revise his design for tearing up part of Venice’s 16th-century Fondaco dei Tedeschi so it can be converted into a shopping mall for Benetton. Yet without a hint of irony, Koolhaas as Biennale director complains that corporate culture has imposed a mind-numbing conformity among his colleagues. “The market economy has eroded the moral status of architecture,” Koolhaas writes in the catalogue for his exhibition. “It has divorced architects from the public and pushed them into the arms of the private sector—they do not serve ‘you’ anymore, but a diffuse ‘them.’ ”

And so Koolhaas has removed practising architects (besides himself) from the stage. In fact, he agreed to direct the show only if he could sever all connections to contemporary architecture. The most radical show at the Biennale is Elements Of Architecture. Here, Koolhaas, with a team of Harvard grad students, has deconstructed the last several thousand years of architectural history with a sampling of 15 different building elements chosen from different cultures and eras. This arty history of ceilings, doors and windows is told through a barrage of objects, charts, photographs, movies and endless texts. One gallery on toilets is covered in wallpaper that includes explicit photographs of people using various fixtures designed for defecation and urination. There are also actual toilets ranging from a Roman chariot-styled latrine to a computerized Japanese “washlet” that measures the chemical composition of the user’s waste.

Elements details the advantages of the latest building technologies while obsessively documenting what has been lost to the exigencies of the global economy. One gallery devoted to modern facades describes how exterior walls evolved from an ensemble of stylistic parts to a skin focused on protection against the elements. On the floor are facade sections including a media facade that conveys information, and a green one embedded with plants. We are constantly reminded of the trade-offs that come with technology. A display of a heavily insulated facade notes—erroneously—that because this type of wall is focused on saving energy, its windows cannot be opened: “People are not to be trusted to regulate the environment.”

The sense of hopelessness continues at Koolhaas’s Monditalia exhibition in the Arsenale building. Homage is paid to Italy’s past with a faded 5th-century map, printed on an enormous billowing sheet. Yet many of the modern “case studies” emphasize the country’s failures. One exhibit features photographs of abandoned masterpieces of Italian modern architecture built during the country’s boom years in the 1950s. An exhibit on the resort city of Milano Marittima exposes how real estate speculation has littered the place with derelict, uninhabited buildings and tourist traps.

Fortunately, Koolhaas was unable to impose his vision on all 66 national pavilions exhibiting at the Biennale. In fact, Italy’s own pavilion presents an exuberant counterpoint to Monditalia. Here, an exhibit of photographs displays stylish modern works of architecture from Milan; another showcases modern forms sensitively grafted onto historic buildings, and a third celebrates works that address the constraints of their sites. Rem Koolhaas would do well to study this pavilion before he attempts to design another shopping mall in Venice.

AIA Convention 2014: Rahm Emanuel Claims Your Attempts are Important

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on stage at the AIA Convention in his metropolis.

Two days after asserting that Chicago will host its possess architecture biennial in 2015, Mayor Rahm Emanuel opened the 2014 AIA Conference here this morning, in which he named equally the convention and the subject of architecture vital to the long term of all cities, and Chicago in specific. “In the very same way that one hundred years ago Chicago was the epicenter of contemporary architecture, Chicago is now at the middle of rethinking livable, sustainable, and stunning cities,” Emanuel said. “Your work is vital to that.”

He also known as it fitting that the convention is getting held in Chicago, a town that had long-standing and deep connections with the architectural career. “This is a town that not only has the home of the initial skyscraper, but also has 3 independent architecture colleges and a few separate architectural awards,” Emanuel mentioned. “No other metropolis has that deep heritage with architecture.”

Emanuel observed that Chicago’s endeavours are now extending past the downtown—an location that grabs so significantly focus—to its neighborhoods. He highlighted two efforts: the current conversion of a former commercial residence to space for artists and lofts in the city’s Bronzeville community on the South Aspect, and the reconstruction of the Chicago Transit Authority’s Pink Line. “Bronzeville is a spot exactly where contemporary American Jazz was produced,” Emanuel stated. “That [previous industrial] building is now the residence of twenty artists and lofts…the concept of re-thinking your place is crucial to metropolitan areas right now.”

That link in between artists and architecture is likely further in Chicago, Emanuel famous. He explained that the city’s reconstruction of the Crimson Line is an illustration of a required investment decision in infrastructure but there is more to it. “On Monday we announced that every station will have artwork by Chicago artists telling the tale of the neighborhoods,” Emanuel stated. “It’s now heading to be a spot for community artwork and not just community transportation.”

Heading ahead: “We need to have to make positive our neighborhoods and our downtown are thought of in a way that we want to reside our lives, that at the identical time spend homage to the earlier and consider about the foreseeable future,” Emanuel stated. “We need to have to embrace its development in a sustainable and livable way and do it in a way that is so beautiful that individuals from around the globe want to arrive and experience it.”

Wichita medical faculty getting ready for growth

WICHITA – The College of Kansas University of Medicine in Wichita is examining its services as it develops plans to ask the Kansas Legislature for improved funding for a future enlargement.

The college hired Helix Architecture and Layout of Kansas Metropolis, Missouri, to assess the amenities and compile a report that university officers will use to create cost estimates for the enlargement, The Wichita Eagle described.

Dean Garold Minns explained he hopes to have the information ready by the September.

“It really is premature for us to go to the Legislature with proposals when we do not even have a very good estimate of the cost or how a lot square footage we need to have. This will support us formulate that,” Minns stated.

The expansion programs are component of a purpose to have eighty students acquire all 4 a long time of health-related school on the Wichita campus. Presently, the university has 28 pupils who take all four a long time at Wichita but about 50 students have accomplished their healthcare training in Kansas Metropolis.

“We’re really quite a lot at ability right now,” Minns explained.

Helix is also executing facilities assessments for the health-related faculty campus in Kansas City, Kansas, Minns stated. That campus not too long ago gained $ twenty five million in condition bonds and another $ 25 million from the Hall Family Basis for a new educational creating. The remaining expenses for the $ 75 million venture will be paid by the university and its endowment, with the creating scheduled to open up in drop 2017.

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The Agenda: Clemson architecture building approved T-Rav collecting signatures 25k work …

The Agenda: Clemson architecture building approved; T-Rav gathering signatures; 25k jobs coming to Charleston

CofC gives Monte Lee big extension

Posted by Sam Spence on Thu, Jun 26, 2014 at 12:33 PM

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, fresh off a primary challenge from the right himself, says that expensive conservative campaigns against sitting Republican lawmakers, like the failed challenge settled this week in a Mississippi runoff, amount to a “purification effort” that could hurt the GOP in the long run. [NYT]

Reality star and former state Treasurer Thomas Ravenel is reportedly gathering signatures to challenge Graham in November’s general election as an independent. [The State, P&C]

Charleston Board of Architectural Review members on Wednesday gave 4-2 approval to the controversial contemporary building design proposed for the Clemson Architecture Center on Meeting Street. [P&C]

Tourism officials in Myrtle Beach are not too happy with a toungue-in-cheek bank statement printed by Golf Digest that chronicles a bunch of golf buddies’ hypothetical weekend along the Grand Strand. Highlights: “You’re Innocent Bail Bonds: $ 2,500”, “Wild Boar Golf & Skeet: $ 115.22”, and tree line-items for “Hush Hush Cabaret.” [WBTW]

A new Charleston Chamber report says that 25,000 jobs will be created in the Charleston area in the next five years, nearly seven times the growth seen in the last half-decade. [P&C]

College of Charleston baseball Head Coach Monte Lee will be staying with the Cougars for a while after the school signed him to an eight-year, $ 193,000/year contract. The Cougars advanced to the NCAA super regionals this year for the second time in program history and Lee was reportedly a finalist to take over the same position at Arizona State. [Live 5]

Weird headline of the day: “In S.C. and the U.S. the face of population growth is a wrinkled one” [P&C]

Mark Sanford is written up in this week’s New York Times Sunday Magazine, five years after his Statehouse confession now that he is back in the U.S. House of Representatives. [NYT Mag]

The Florence Morning News has a recount of the latest saga unfolding in Latta S.C., where voters cast ballots to change the town’s form of government to a weak mayor system, stripping the controversial mayor of his hiring and firing power. Wednesday morning, before the election was certified, the mayor hired a new police chief, the first to hold the position since he fired the last chief, an openly gay woman who had been with the local police for more than two decades. [Florence Morning News, CP]

Common Cause’s John Crangle: “Alan Wilson following in father’s footsteps on ethics” [The State]

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Aspiration designs: Verify out Birmingham&#39s Leading ten contemporary architectural delights

The Big Monitor cinema at Millennium Level will be keeping a unique one-off screening of the 2010 motion thriller Inception on Friday, June 27, in conjunction with the Enjoy Architecture Festival.

Directed by Christopher Nolan and starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a thief who commits company espionage by infiltrating the subconscious of his targets, the brain-bending and sometimes developing-bending movie attracts the viewers into the entire world of goals – and desires in desires.

In honour of the distinctive return of Inception to the Giant Display – the largest cinema display screen in the Midlands and the next biggest in the Uk – and also the Adore Architecture Pageant, we’ve made a decision to consider a seem at some of Birmingham’s Prime 10 most intriguing and quirky items of architecture.

Modern developments this sort of as the Library of Birmingham are pushing the boundaries of developing form outside of traditional considering and away from the concept of grey blocks of concrete that give this sort of a drab and depressing seem to a lot of of Britain’s urban centres. We think you will find some rather striking pieces of design and style on offer you in and close to Birmingham.

Pictures of every building or structure are showcased in the gallery below. Have your say on the city’s architecture in our remarks part. Which is your favorite piece of architecture in Birmingham?

 

1. Selfridges, Bullring

Opened in 2003, Selfridges in Bullring was designed by Jan Kaplicky and Amanda Levete. Costing a overall of about £60 million to assemble, the constructing won the RIBA Award for Architecture in 2004. Interestingly, a lot of folks now credit rating Selfridges as currently being one of the initial key illustrations of ‘Blobitecture’ with numerous similar style buildings before long adhering to match.

2. Library of Birmingham

The Library of Birmingham was created by Francine Houben and was voted Architect Journal’s constructing of the year shortly right after opening in April 2013. The design price was a whopping £188.8 million and was designed with an aquifer ground source program which means it’s as fashionable as it is eco-friendly.

three. BCC Car Park, Millennium Point

In 2013, the Birmingham Town Council car park situated next to Millennium Point was integrated in a top ten record of the world’s coolest auto parks. Created by Mark Sloane, it adopts a ‘Brutalist style’ and features blue acrylic panels offering the illusion that the car park glows blue during the night.

four. The Floozie in the Jacuzzi

Fountains are a kind of architecture too, and Victoria Square in Birmingham’s metropolis centre characteristics the affectionately named Floozie in the Jacuzzi. She is currently heading through some nicely-essential repairs so will be again to her previous glory extremely before long.

five. The Cube

The Cube was developed by entire world renowned architect Ken Shuttleworth. Born and bred in Birmingham Ken aimed to give the metropolis with a landmark constructing that would aid define its essence on the entire world stage. Its placing and remarkable exterior was inspired by Birmingham’s jewellery creating and industrial heritage.

six. Hyatt Regency Resort Birmingham

With its putting mirrored frontage, the Hyatt Regency Resort Birmingham has become one of the city’s most legendary landmarks. First opened in 1990, the luxury 319 room hotel is at present nearing completion of a £6m refurbishment such as the introduction of a model new bar and restaurant notion.

seven. Bournville College

The re-positioned £66m Bournville College in Longbridge was designed by architect Salim Hussain and opened in September 2012. The unusually shaped constructing was meant to reflect a related condition to that of a lightning bolt with heaps of lights and windows allowing folks to see what pursuits have been getting area within.

eight. The Spiral Café, Bullring

The Spiral Café was made by Marks Barfield Architects and received the BDI Excellence in Architecture Award in 2005. The building type is influenced by the 13 century mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci and resembles a shell the exterior of the Café is tough, rugged and tough patinated copper, whereas the inside is easy and treasured and lit by pearl-like spheres.

9. Newman University, Birmingham

Newman College was created by Birmingham architect, Glenn Howells. The £20 million undertaking integrated a new library, entrance building and overall performance room. The library was made with massive window panels from roof to ground made to maximise the natural mild and develop a peaceful operating atmosphere for learners.

ten. Millennium Level

Millennium Point is a 37,000sqm combined used creating including the Thinktank science museum, BCU campus and the Large Screen cinema. Formally opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002, the creating represented the first phase of the city’s Eastside project. The constructing type is a deceptively straightforward rectangular block with a cylindrical component for the cinema which bisects the kind.

Overhaul of Architectural Licensing Introduced at NCARB Once-a-year Assembly, Philadelphia

WASHINGTON, June 26, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — At its once-a-year meeting of architect licensing officers from fifty four states and territories, the Countrywide Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has declared a raft of important changes in architectural internships, evaluation and licensing. The team also has released news on its programs and awards in support of tomorrow’s architects.

In addition, NCARB released an in depth statistical study on the architecture job, NCARB by the Figures, which shows that architects are obtaining certified at the youngest median age in a ten years (34 many years), and the quantity of girls implementing for architect credentials is escalating. (Girls now account for 40 percent of all candidates, up from 10 % in the early 1990s.)

Michael J. Armstrong, NCARB’s CEO, explained, “NCARB is unwavering in our ongoing commitment to bettering our services to architects no matter exactly where they are in their occupation. We’ve been actively listening to prospect considerations, and creating solutions that provide higher obtain although preserving integrity and defending the general public wellness, basic safety and welfare.”

Between the major announcements by NCARB about optimistic changes to architectural internships, evaluation and licensing were:

  1. A important proposal to streamline and overhaul the Intern Improvement Program (IDP) in excess of the up coming couple of a long time, which will decrease the number of several hours necessary to complete the IDP and align it to the prepared tests divisions for Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) to be applied in late 2016.
  2. Acceptance of a main modification to IDP’s “6-month rule.” Earlier, you could only generate credit for expertise for gained in the past 6 months. Effective July one, it allows credit history for intern expertise up to 5 years in the past, with credit rating for knowledge more mature than eight months valued fifty %.
  3. Efficient October one, a decrease in the hold out time for retesting of ARE® divisions, from 6 months to sixty times. Candidates who have unsuccessful portion of the examination can retake that division as soon as sixty days soon after the earlier attempt, up to a few instances in a working yr.
  4. New proposals announced to overhaul the Broadly Skilled Architect (BEA) and Broadly Skilled Overseas Architect (BEFA) Packages. These changes will improve the process and reduce the time for U.S. and overseas architects who do not currently fulfill the specifications to receive NCARB certification for reciprocal licensure.

About NCARB


NCARB helps its member architectural registration boards of all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands in carrying out their responsibilities and supplying a certification system for person architects. NCARB safeguards the general public overall health, protection, and welfare by major the regulation of the practice of architecture by way of requirements for licensure and credentialing of architects. NCARB also signifies the pursuits of member boards just before community and non-public businesses, and has established reciprocal registration in the U.S. and Canada. Check out: www.ncarb.org.


Contact: Chris Sullivan

914.462.2096, chris@ccsullivan.com

Supply NCARB

Associate Professor of Architecture

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Institution: Fairmont Condition University
Spot: Fairmont, WV
Classification: &#thirteen

  • School – Good and Used Arts – Architecture
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Posted: 06/26/2014
Application Due: 07/13/2014
Sort: Full Time
The University of Science and Engineering at Fairmont State College (FSU) is at present recruiting applicants for an Affiliate Professor of Architecture for a Fall 2014 appointment. The personal chosen for this nine-thirty day period, tenure track position need to be in a position to train undergraduate and graduate studio and lecture classes in the Architecture system. The greater part of the assignment will be associated with the freshly produced MArch program of examine. The applicant should have the capability to take a major function with NAAB accreditation. Applicants ought to have a Master’s diploma in Architecture, MArch, or intently associated area (Ph.D. in Architecture or related discipline is desired), and be a Registered Architect with NCARB certification.

For complete job description and to implement, go to&#thirteen http://www.fairmont.pierpontjobs.com, placement # 20140109.

To understand far more about our establishment, check out http://www.fairmontstate.edu.&#thirteen AA/EOE&#13 &#13

People from historically underrepresented groups are encouraged to implement.